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Being intimidating good

Monsanto already dominates America’s food chain with its genetically modified seeds. Just as frightening as the corporation’s tactics–ruthless legal battles against small farmers–is its decades-long history of toxic contamination.

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The Control of Nature For centuries—millennia—farmers have saved seeds from season to season: they planted in the spring, harvested in the fall, then reclaimed and cleaned the seeds over the winter for re-planting the next spring. seeds that would resist its own herbicide, Roundup, offering farmers a convenient way to spray fields with weed killer without affecting crops. For nearly all of its history the United States Patent and Trademark Office had refused to grant patents on seeds, viewing them as life-forms with too many variables to be patented. In its decision, the court extended patent law to cover “a live human-made microorganism.” In this case, the organism wasn’t even a seed.Establishing your role Spending time with your step-children Communicating with your step-children Stepping back Being a great role model Community Q&A Being a stepparent can be both fulfilling and challenging.If you've married or partnered with a person who already has children, you have to consider them part of a package deal, to be loved, nurtured, and protected to the best of your ability.Some compare Monsanto’s hard-line approach to Microsoft’s zealous efforts to protect its software from pirates.At least with Microsoft the buyer of a program can use it over and over again.This radical departure from age-old practice has created turmoil in farm country.

Some farmers don’t fully understand that they aren’t supposed to save Monsanto’s seeds for next year’s planting. Most Americans know Monsanto because of what it sells to put on our lawns— the ubiquitous weed killer Roundup.

Like many others in rural America, Rinehart knew of Monsanto’s fierce reputation for enforcing its patents and suing anyone who allegedly violated them. They fan out into fields and farm towns, where they secretly videotape and photograph farmers, store owners, and co-ops; infiltrate community meetings; and gather information from informants about farming activities.

Farmers say that some Monsanto agents pretend to be surveyors.

Rinehart later learned that the company had been secretly investigating farmers in his area.

Rinehart never heard from Monsanto again: no letter of apology, no public concession that the company had made a terrible mistake, no offer to pay his attorney’s fees. “If I tried to do something like that it would be bad news. seeds, in 1996, Monsanto has launched thousands of investigations and filed lawsuits against hundreds of farmers and seed dealers.

In Iraq, the groundwork has been laid to protect the patents of Monsanto and other G. To be sure, more and more agricultural corporations and individual farmers are using Monsanto’s G. Faced with a federal lawsuit, Rinehart had to hire a lawyer.